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Hunting tactics of Peregrines and other falcons - Section: 13 Page: Paintings-3 - Peregrine prey selection and eagle interference

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Hunting tactics of Peregrines and other falcons - Chapter: Section-13 - Peregrine prey selection and eagle interference - Page: HUNTAC_0099 Image#: 0


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If attacked by a Peregrine, flying ducks habitually save themselves by plunging
into the nearest water. The immature falcon in the painting at left, in hot pursuit
of four Northern Pintails (Anas acuta), is not likely to catch one of them,
because the ducks are already over water and descending. By contrast, as illus-
trated in the painting above, this falcon is coming in low from the lake and in a
good position to overtake its prey over land, grabbing it in midair or after it
drops down onto marshy ground. Migrating Peregrines consume only the neck
and part of the breast of a duck and leave the remains to scavengers. Females
are capable of warding off harriers and buzzards, but male Peregrines-
one third smaller than the females — commonly lose their ducks.

OCR
Tag: buzzards duck ducks falcon harriers migrating peregrine peregrines pintails

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